Clinical management of COPD

Long term conditions

Partner Organisations

  • Keele University

Themes

  • Education and skills
  • Innovation and adoption

Date Initiated

31 March 2014

Project Status

In Progress

The clinical management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) programme has engaged with three CCGs, with 49 primary care staff taking part in training to increase the uptake of best practice care for COPD patients. Participants were required to undertake (or plan) a small service delivery project within their practice as a means of promoting improvements in care, with project ideas being pursued including a review of procedures for following up patients following acute exacerbations and the introduction of ways to promote an increase in referrals for pulmonary rehabilitation.

Planned outcomes were:

  • It has been estimated that the current burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) could be reduced by the greater adoption by professionals of evidence-based practice for preventing, detecting and treating COPD and the improved integration of services available for the care of patients with COPD.  
  • The roll out of a previously piloted training initiative that aims to increase the uptake of best practice care for COPD patients by members of the primary care team (GPs and nurses). The planned outcomes were that the initiative would promote any required improvements in the delivery of care for patients with COPD within participating primary care practices.
  • The aim is to deliver the training initiative to primary care teams based in CCGs with high prevalence rates for COPD. 

Programme Outcomes

  • Teams from three CCGs participated, totaling 28 practices and 49 delegates. 
  • Key components of the training offered for staff from each CCG included: COPD diagnosis and monitoring, clinical management of COPD, “living with” COPD, pulmonary rehabilitation, patient self-help/ management and palliative/ end of life care. As intended, sessions have been delivered by “local” professionals as this helps to place topics and the use of case histories in a local context and also increases course participants’ awareness of local services for COPD. The “living with” COPD sessions were also given by members of Breathe Easy, a patient self-help group, and a representative of the British Lung Foundation. 
  • Participants were also required to undertake (or plan) a small service delivery project within their practice as a means of promoting improvements in care. Feedback to date indicates that they are engaging with this aspect of the training initiative. Project ideas being pursued by staff from participating practices include a review of procedures for following up patients following acute exacerbations and the introduction of ways to promote an increase in referrals for pulmonary rehabilitation. 
  • The importance of using “local” speakers was demonstrated as this increased participants’ knowledge of local services and how to access them. In particular, limited awareness of patient self-help groups was evident and, as a result, one practice team is using their in-house project to help establish a Breathe Easy group in their local area.
  • Improved networking and sharing of ideas between practices was also evident.
  • As a result of the previous piloting exercise and the delivery of the training initiative in North Staffordshire, Sandwell and West Birmingham, and Stoke CCGs, a network of primary care staff with a special interest in the delivery of care for COPD has been developed. This network of staff represents a resource that could be accessed for future COPD related projects supported by the WMAHSN or other bodies.

 

Programme Lead

Dr Roger Beech
e: r.beech@keele.ac.uk
t: 0121 371 8061