Effective practice

Innovation and adoption

Partner Organisations

  • University of Birmingham

Themes

  • Mental health
  • Long term conditions

Date Initiated

31 March 2014

Project Status

In Progress

The effective practice study is designed to work with local health services to assist in the application of an intellectual framework for the implementation of complex clinical guidelines that NHS trusts consider being a priority.  

In conjunction with NHS site champions and managers and collaborating management and business schools, the team will introduce a model for complex service change and evaluate the effectiveness of this.

The programme has seen engagement with local clinicians, the regional NICE implementation consultant and 16 West Midlands Medical Directors. A practical working group has been established to discuss the practical application of the intellectual framework for change and progress, successes, pitfalls and solutions in applying the quality standard using the framework.

Programme Outcomes

  • A literature search for evidence relating to guideline development and successful implementation of complex, cross-organisational (NICE, Department of Health or professional organisation) guidelines, and strategies successfully employed for health service change, was undertaken. 
  • Researchers met with local clinicians responsible for chronic conditions and the regional NICE implementation consultant for expert opinion on priority guidance for implementation. 
  • 16 West Midlands Medical Directors were invited to a meeting for feedback on the literature review of strategies for health service change and the topic list.  
  • Establishment of a practical working group to meet with the research team and collaborators to discuss the practical application of the intellectual framework for change.  This will discuss progress, successes, pitfalls and solutions in applying the quality standard using the framework.
  • The project is proving beneficial in increasing the shared capacity for improvement across key groups within several West Midlands acute NHS Trusts, CCGs and mental health trusts and the universities of Warwick and Birmingham.
  • Two local acute NHS trusts, a mental health trust and two CCGs have contacted to as the research team and the WMAHSN to work with them to address the NICE dementia guideline requiring prompt assessment and referral to a memory assessment service of at risk patients. This could be the start of a regional dementia collaborative.
  • This study has the potential to improve quality of care, patient safety and patient satisfaction with services, and reduce costs at West Midlands NHS trusts.  
  • Adoption of NICE guidelines for the early recognition of dementia and delirium and the prevention of delirium are likely to have considerable impact on local NHS costs and patient care. 

 

Programme Lead

Richard Lilford
e: r.j.lilford@warwick.ac.uk
t: 0121 371 8061